Homecoming to Ourselves: A Metaphor on Stability

Where does it all lead?
What will become of us?

These were your young questions,
And young answers were revealed.
It leads to each other. We become
Ourselves. 

– PATTI SMITH – 

At the end of August 2019, I gave away most of my material possessions save for a few boxes of clothes and books to move onto a 37’ sailboat moored at a marina near the Cambie Street Bridge in Vancouver, BC. In the past decade, I’ve moved around Vancouver eleven times, from Kitsilano to the West End, Main Street, and Commercial Drive. My strive to harmonize my external world through controlling my living situation, not to mention my work and relationships, only led to ongoing stress and chaos. The more I strove to build a world outside of myself, the more I had to work to maintain a lifestyle I wasn’t sure I wanted

The life I’ve created for myself at the marina is a metaphor on stability: I’ve let go of all the things I thought kept me grounded and connected to what it means to be me and connected to an inner landscape where I no longer need to question myself or what it means to be stable in body and mind. In the solitude and space at sea, cocooned in the rhythm of the water and calls of nature, I’ve been able to carve out some quiet for myself. In the process of letting go, I’ve been able to grow and connect to an inner stability that was there all along, I just never knew how to find it. 

In my travels around Vancouver cohabitating and adapting to varied personalities and living styles, I’ve discovered a lot about what it takes for me to feel grounded in any given situation. I’ve come to realize that my feeling of security may be influenced by external factors but ultimately comes down to my inner awareness. Stability is important in our lives for the simple fact that when we feel secure, we’re able to interact with our environment, and our communities with more integrity and love, overcoming insecurity and fear.  

 You have to create within yourself the experience of beauty, liberation, and infinity. -BKS Iyengar

BKS Iyengar, Father of Iyengar Yoga and author of Light on Life, discusses stability at length in terms of the yoga practice and how yoga asana may create a sense of lightness, precision, strength, awareness, balance, and overall harmony in the body and mind which ultimately translates to a higher state of consciousness and discovery of the Self. Iyengar’s approach to stability comes from an awareness of the physical self through yoga poses; to train the body and calm the mind. Ultimately creating harmony and inner stability that isn’t thrown off-course by our external surroundings. 

Iyengar provides that as stability becomes a habit, maturity and clarity follow.  In exploring the yoga asana, one will discover balance in the body and stability. Balance is not possible without stability and balance assists in stabilizing the mind. In the physical practice of yoga, the more grounded you are in your lower body through the feet, legs, and pelvis, the more lightness and flexibility you’re able to explore in the upper body through the spine, arms, and head. We explore this idea in our bodies when we move: the more connected you are through your feet and legs in any physical activity, the more ease and balance you have in your body through movement.

According to Iyengar, working with the body and discovering a physical balance produces a balanced and stable mind. A stable mind is one that is focused on the present. A stable mind is one that is free of judgments and limitations. A stable mind is one that is concerned with the higher Truth of what it means to be human and alive. A stable mind knows the Self as unchangeable and yet flexible regardless of external circumstances or forces. A stable mind is one who questions and constantly evolves.

Keep asking yourself the hard questions, continue evolving into who you truly are.
smiling vinyasa yogi
Clara Roberts-Oss
Yogi, Teacher, Student

Stability is a sense of inner groundedness that doesn’t come from where you sleep or who you’re friends with, though these factors contribute to whether or not you feel stable and safe. My current sense of stability comes from a deep knowing within that no matter where I live or what the external factors are in landscape, space, neighbors, and possessions, my sense of stability comes from a well within me. I am more grounded and secure in who I am now, more so than where I was ten years ago. I feel it’s a combined factor of pursuing yoga as a means to physically, mentally, and emotionally ground myself in my body and the present moment, my ability to let go of the small stuff that doesn’t matter and really shouldn’t affect my inner being, and my decade of experience putting myself in situations where I tested my strengths and fears.

On an objective level, stability means you have access to shelter and food and water; relationships where you feel cared for and loved and accepted, and access to resources that provide measures of safety. This is why it’s so devastating that a majority of human beings around the world, including the downtown Eastside of Vancouver, are lacking in such areas and will always be struggling at a level of mere survival. It’s elitist for me to say that stability is subjective when I’ve always had access to healthcare and healthy food and a roof over my head and a loving family who I can reach out to when I’m scared or lonely or frustrated. From my vantage point, stability is subjective in that what makes me feel grounded may be vastly different from what makes someone else feel happy or safe or stable in themselves.  

 

A Homecoming to Ourselves

Our lives are a narrative of trial and error; of beauty and terror. No one knows the answer and no one can tell you what is best for you. You have to go out and ask the questions and experience it directly for yourself. The best access point I have to get more clear and grounded is through my body. This I know to be true because I’ve directly experienced it through yoga and the words of BKS Iyengar. They ring pure and true for me through the dedication to my yoga practice. In all my years of picking stuff up and putting it down again, in diverse homes and careers and relationships, my constant has been my yoga practice, first in asana and later in breath and meditation. 

So, what is stability? I would ask each of you to sit down and contemplate for yourselves what makes you feel grounded; what relationships you’ve cultivated to give you a sense of belonging; if you’ve established a lifestyle that’s balanced and gives you purpose. For me, stability is a deep sense of trust in knowing I can handle whatever may come my way.

Stability is a homecoming to myself. 

Much love,
Stephanie 
stephaniedawntrembath

Survey 2019 responses

yogi survey on temp.clararobertsoss.com

At the beginning of June we ran a survey to learn more about my kula (community).

We wanted to know:
What style of yoga did they enjoy practicing?
How many practiced online versus in the studio?
What were they looking to learn more about?

I thought it’d be fun to share some of the highlights:

 

We received over 200 responses!

Not surprisingly, my community loves Vinyasa/Flow yoga and meditation and 89% tend to stick to the teachers that they love most.

When asked what they appreciated most about my teaching, it was:
-Authenticity/Creativity in sequencing (21% of responses)
-Mantras/Chanting/Pranayama/Philosophy (20% of responses)

Which are the two things that light me up the most about teaching!
Happy to see we’re on the same page 🙂

Based on this feedback there will be lots of focus on sequencing, mantra and meditation.

 

I also learned that 60% of my kula practice yoga online. This insight helped to motivate me to create my platform to practice yoga online.

51% of the respondents have attended teacher training

40% of those who have not attended a teacher training are interested in attending one in the near future.

Many of you shared you preferred part time teacher training versus immersions.

Based on that feedback our 2020 training format has changed.
200 hour yoga teacher training has been broken up into weekend modules over four months.
300 hour teacher training has been broken down into three 10 day modules
Both are being offered in Vancouver, BC.

Many of the participants appreciated how we value intimate trainings, capping the 200 hour training to 18 and the 300 Hour YTT to 12 people.

Another core value of mine is giving student teachers lots of individual attention so again, so happy we’re on the same page!

One piece of great feedback from those who have taken yoga teacher trainings, is that they’d like to have more support after the training. Based on that, I will be launching an online forum in the near future to connect all my student teachers together to share ideas, receive feedback from not only myself but their peers.

 

Thank you Michelle for creating and aggregating all the surveys!
I also want to thank all 200 of you who took the time to fill out the survey!!
And I can’t wait to share what we have brewing for you. Stay tuned 🙂

 

I am so grateful to my community for being so open to trying the many, let’s say “alternative” ways I like to express, teach and explore yoga.

You inspire me to continue to learn, play and think outside of the “mainstream” yoga box. I would not be the teacher I am without you.
Full pranams,
Clara

Resources:
Playlists on Spotify
Meditations on Soundcloud
Free Yoga Classes on my site

Japanese Yoga

Japanese yoga funny vid

The beauty of yoga is that different cultures and regions have been using it the way they find it best. Yoga is a broad concept and different kinds of yoga are fruitful for different reasons. Japanese yoga is an ancient practice that is still practiced by fitness gurus all over the globe. It is believed, and proved, that this yoga helps in healing one physically and mentally. If you are suffering from any kind of ailment, you will find betterment with the help of Japanese yoga.

How is Japanese yoga different?

Even though it is as effective for the body as other forms of yoga, Japanese yoga is slightly different in terms of practice. It changes as the seasons change. Depending on the season, the movements of this yoga differ. Also, you will be focusing on different things in different seasons. The reason why people do this yoga is that it helps in dealing with any kind of physical or mental illness. Whether the pain is in your body or your soul, this yoga relieves you from it. You will be performing several repetitive actions and they will help in reducing anxiety, promoting sleep, preventing digestion and improving digestion.

Sometimes, it is not about your health. You just want to improve your posture and be more flexible. Japanese yoga helps in keeping you flexible and also maintains your posture. With this yoga, you will be in charge of your health. As a result, you do not only build strength on the inside but also on the outside. Even if you are already doing yoga, you can bring variation in it by trying out Japanese yoga. Soon, you will see the multiple benefits that this yoga has for your physical health and cognitive functioning.

Benefits of Japanese Yoga

Japanese yoga is quite advantageous for your physical and emotional wellness. First of all, it brings mental clarity to your body. If you are in a bad place in your life and the depression is making you lose productivity and peace, you can relieve the stress and anxiety through yoga. It will help you relax so that you can think rationally and make better decisions with a clearer mind. Life can get hard these days, with all the things you have to manage at home and at work. Personal relations also get hard from time to time. Japanese yoga induces the release of endorphins in the body so that you can feel relaxed and happy.

Fitness is another aspect of your life that is enhanced with Japanese yoga. When you do yoga, your agility increases and the muscle tone improves over time, allowing you to be more productive. Consequently, your improved bone health will give you the ability to be more active than you have ever been in your entire life. Thus, you can expect an overall effect of Japanese yoga on your long-term wellness.

Sometimes Carolyn and I like to make funny things, this one is a video.

 

Check it out.

 

 

Allow the world to touch you deeply

A path with heart Jack Kornfield

Depending upon the lineage you follow or study, the practice is either to move away from or towards your strong emotions. As someone who lives in the world, meaning not in an ashram or hermitage, I find that working with and embracing the many aspects of myself has created a more integrated me. I have found that when I shy away from my strong emotions (which I can have many of), I tend to leave my body, to check out. As Jack Kornfield says so eloquently below, the practice of staying present to the feelings/emotions/sensations takes courage and compassion; to be honest with what is arising and to truly feel it. When we can be in the feeling, there comes what he calls “wise understanding”, that pain, grief and sorrow are inevitable. From this understanding, we can find peace with those feelings, with those parts of ourselves and from there the self-inflicted war can stop. This can be a life long process so be patient with yourself but continue to stay present and observe the inevitable shift within you.

I hope you enjoy this excerpt as much as I do. Much love. xo

“The purpose of a spiritual discipline is to give us a way to stop the war, not by our force of will, but organically, through understanding and gradual training. Ongoing spiritual practice can help us cultivate a new way of relating to life in which we let go of our battles.

When we step out of the battle, we see anew, as the Tao Te Ching says, ‘with eyes unclouded by longing’. We see how each of us creates conflict. We see our constant likes and dislikes, the fight to resist all that frightens us. We see our own prejudice, greed, and territoriality. All this is hard for us to look at, but it is really there. Then underneath these ongoing battles, we see pervasive feelings of incompleteness and fear. We see how much our struggle with life has kept our hearts closed.

When we let go of our battles and open our heart to things as they are, then we come to rest in the present moment. This is the beginning and the end of spiritual practice. Only in this moment can we discover that which is timeless. Only here can we find the love that we seek. Love in the past is simply memory, and love in the future is fantasy. Only in reality of the present can we love, can we awaken, can we find peace and understanding and connection with ourselves and the world.

A sign in a Las Vegas casino aptly says, ‘You Must Be Present to Win’. Stopping the war and becoming present are two sides of the same activity. To come into the present is to stop the war. To come into the present means to experience whatever is here and now. Most of us have spent our lives caught up in plans, expectations, ambitions for the future, in regrets, guilt, or shame about the past. When we come into the present, we begin to feel the life around us again, but we also encounter whatever we have been avoiding. We must have the courage to face whatever is present–or pain, our desires, our grief, our loss, our secret hopes, our love–everything that moves us most deeply. As we stop the war, each of us will find something from which we have been running–our loneliness, our unworthiness, our boredom, our shame, our unfulfilled desires. We must face these parts of ourselves as well.

You have may have heard of ‘out of body experience’, full of lights and visions. A true spiritual path demands something more challenging, what could be called an ‘in the body experience’. We must connect to our body, to our feelings, to our life just now, if we are to awaken.

To live in the present demands an ongoing and unwavering commitment. As we follow a spiritual path, we are required to stop the war not once but many times. Over and over we feel the familiar tug of thoughts and reactions that takes us away from the present moment. When we stop and listen, we can feel how each thing that we fear or crave (really two sides of the same dissatisfaction) propels us out of our hearts into false idea of how we would like life to be. If we listen even more closely, we can feel how we have learned to sense ourselves as limited by fear and identified with that craving. From this small sense of ourselves, we often believe that our own happiness can come only from possessing something or can be only at someone else’s expense.

To stop the war and come into the present is to discover a greatness of our own heart that can include the happiness of all beings as inseparable from our own. When we let ourselves feel the fear, the discontent, the difficulties we have always avoided, our heart softens. Just as it is a courageous act to face all the difficulties from which we have always run, it is also an act of compassion. According to Buddhist scriptures, compassion is the ‘quivering of the pure heart’ when we have allowed ourselves to be touched by the pain of life. The knowledge that we can do this and survive helps us awaken the greatness of our heart. With greatness of heart, we can sustain a presence in the midst of life’s suffering, in the midst of life’s fleeting impermanence. We can open to the world–it’s ten thousands joys and ten thousand sorrows.

As we allow the world to touch us deeply, we recognize that just as there is pain in our lives, so there is  pain in everyone’s life. This is the birth of wise understanding. Wise understanding sees that suffering is inevitable, that all things that are born die. Wise understanding sees and accepts life as a whole. With wise understanding we allow ourselves to contain all things, both dark and light, and we come to a sense of peace. This is not the peace of denial or running away, but the peace we find in the heart that has rejected nothing, that touches all things with compassion.”

Jack Kornfield, A Path With Heart

 

 

PS.

Practice yoga online with me or catch me at my next yoga event

 

 

 

Take Care of Your Mind First

equal vision quote

Take Care of Your Mind First.

The greatest gift meditation has ever taught me is that a much larger percentage than I thought of the world around me is self created. All the stories I make up about what’s going on around is exactly that, stories. So sit still Clara and really see what’s going on around you.

A great excerpt that nails it:

“Sri Ramakrishna Parahamsa told this fine story: A few people were walking along the road early in the morning, and they saw a man lying on the side of the road. The first one said, ‘He must have spent the whole night gambling and couldn’t reach home, so he fell asleep here. Gamblers are like that. The don’t reach home safely.’ Then he walked away.

The next one spoke, ‘Poor man, he must be very ill. We shouldn’t disturb a sick man. Let him rest there.’ Then he walked away.

The third one came and said to the man on the roadside, ‘You’re a bum. You don’t know how to drink. Don’t you know one or two is enough? Probably they gave you free drinks, and now you’re down.’ He treated him as a drunkard.

The first fellow thought the man had been gambling and was sleeping. The second thought he was sick, and the third thought he was drunk. Then the fourth man spoke: ‘A saint doesn’t care where he is. Probably he’s in higher consciousness, samadhi. A saint can be anywhere…This man is probably above physical consciousness. Let’s not disturb him.’ Then he bowed and walked away.

We don’t know who was right. All four may have been wrong. They all saw the same person differently because they projected themselves. A drinker thinks the other is a drunk. A saint sees a saint. The world as you perceive it is nothing but your own projection. If there is hell in your mind, you won’t see heaven anywhere. If there is heaven in your mind, you can’t see hell anywhere. That’s why it’s said, ‘Correct your vision, and you will see the truth.’ Self -reformation will bring the right view…The teaching given here is: Take care of your own mind first.”

Sri Swami Satchindanada, The Living Gita

 

 

PS.

Practice yoga online with me or catch me at my next yoga event

 

 

 

 

 

 

Equal Vision

equal vision quote

“Having equal vision means you don’t see anybody as low or high. To you both thief and police officer are equal. You don’t see the superficial. The Self of the thief is the same as that of the police officer. Something is playing the part of the thief, and that same something is playing the part of the police officer. Because the sage is rooted in the Self, they see both as Self. So, for the sage, they are equal.

This explains the Biblical commandment, “Love your neighbor as your Self.” It doesn’t say, “Love only your good neighbor as your Self,” or “Love your neighbor who has the same label. If he’s Catholic, love him. If she’s Protestant, throw stones at her.” No. It simply says, “your neighbor.” And who is your neighbor? The one sitting next to you now, or in the next room, the next house, or the next town. Everyone close to you is your neighbor.

But how to love your neighbor as your own Self? You have to see your Self in that person. Otherwise, you can’t love them as your own Self. How can you see your Self in another if you don’t know your Self? Suppose I say, “Here’s a banana. Please see the banana that you had yesterday in this banana.” To do that you should have had a banana yesterday in order to know what a banana is. Only then will you recognize one and the other as the same. If I don’t know what a banana is, I can’t say this one is the same as the other, and I love his as I loved the other banana.

The clue here is to know your Self and then see your Self in your neighbour. Then love them as you love your Self. That’s why someone who has realized Self will always have equal vision based on that Self or that spirit. A Divine-realized person will see nothing but Divinity everywhere, even though that Divinity may be clothed in different forms and using different names. That’s why Lord Krishna says that whether it’s a dog or an outcast or a great spiritual person, it’s all the same to a person of wisdom.

How can we truly come together? Only with this spiritual knowledge—not by mental, physical or financial knowledge. We can never find oneness in any of these areas, no in the name of a country, race, creed, community, money or education. They only way to see everybody equally is in that divine vision. The we see the same truth coloured different ways.

I’m stressing the point here because we often talk about unity, oneness and harmony. But true harmony can be experienced only by realizing spirit and seeing that spirit in everybody. In all other areas we see differences. Such harmony won’t last long. When people dress the same way or speak the same language, they in a sort of harmony. But if somebody speaks a different language, they are seen as different. It’s not universal harmony then. There ’s only one universal truth. That’s the great advantage of realizing one’s own true Self.”

Sri Swami Satchidananda, The Living Gita

 

PS.

Practice yoga online with me or catch me at my next yoga event

 

 

 

 

 

The Tension of Opposites

The tension of opposites

There has been a big debate as to whether or not someone on the spiritual path can also be a householder. Can someone who is devoted to gaining a deeper awareness/understanding of the internal landscape also be in charge of getting the groceries?

Tantric philosophy believes that we can do both. Sally Kempton articulates it so well here in Shakti Awakening.

Note: Think of Parvati and Shiva as different aspects of yourself. Shiva being the seeker and Parvati being the householder.

“Parvati and Shiva hold a creative tension of opposites. He represents the eternal drive for freedom, the yogi’s need to disentangle himself from the world; she represents the feminine drive toward expressive fullness–emotion, rhythm, even the creative flow of thoughts.

When Shiva–who stands for everything that is antithetical to society–unites with Parvati and creates a household life, they are making an enormous statement. Their partnership resolves one of the most embedded dualities in culture: the duality between life in the world and life of the spirit. In Indian life as well as in the Christian mysticism there has always been an opposition between the ascetic yogi, who withdraws from the world in order to realize his nature as spirit, and the householder, entangled in domesticity. Traditionally, the demands of the world, epitomized by family life, are diametrically opposed…

In the Tantric path, however, this dichotomy is transcended. World life and spiritual life, spirit and flesh, are recognized not as duality, but as manifestations of the same power, which is Shakti. The Vijnana Bhairava describes a practice where you discover the ecstasy of the ultimate reality by going into the throbbing heart of pleasure, inside the joy of sex, of song, of delicious food, then meditating on the ‘perfect condition of that joy’ until the supreme bliss reveals itself…

Tantra is the Goddess’s path, which means that it is for people who know how to use the physical and imagined worlds as doorways into the ultimate, as well as for world delight. The Goddess is the mistress of these worlds as she is of the physical world, which is why at the heart of Tantric practices there is a deep respect for the feminine as spiritual authority. In Tantric Quest [one of my favorite books of all time!], Daniel Odier’s teacher tells a story about how a group of hermits debated all day about whether the ultimate truth is a self or a non-self. Finally, one of the ascetics says that the argument can only be resolved by a dakini, a women practitioner. The yogini then goes into meditation on the nondual oneness between self and non-self, and in the space of presence that opens up in the circle, all agree that the discussion has been resolved. They recognize that spirit is not higher than matter, nor is matter devoid of self. Instead, it is the nature of spirit to creatively express itself in form, just as it is the nature of silence to express itself in sound.

The is the recognition that arises out of the union of Shiva and Parvati. Parvati is Shiva’s capacity to express himself in action.Without her, he is simply inactive, iner. Parvati, in scholar David Kinsley’s words, ‘not only compliments Shiva, she completes him.’

 

PS.

Practice yoga online with me or catch me at my next yoga event

 

 

 

 

 

Widen the pot and let the universe spill in

Daniel Odier's Tantric Quest

Happy Autumn Equinox!

This is my favorite time of year because we move from being very externally focused to the internal. As I wrote my intentions for the coming season, I came upon this passage and felt it was only fitting. In joy!

More good words from Daniel Odier’s Tantric Quest…..

 

“You see, ecstasy is the natural human state, and the obstacles we create to ecstasy are part of a dictatorial state our thought makes us live in. Ecstasy is simpler than suffering. It smells good. It is present throughout. It is with us always. There is nothing to do and nothing to look for. It’s enough to stay totally open and let things occur without worrying about changing their nature. By our being really present, continuously present, all reality becomes a source of joy and happiness.

You know that the moment for us to take leave of each other has come, and you won’t suffer because the bond that unites us doesn’t unite us to each other but simply passes through us to extend to the whole universe. You don’t belong to me; I don’t belong to you. We belong to the world, to the divine, and at this moment we know what with our whole being. Our bond isn’t subject to time or space. I will be everywhere you look. You have planted yourself firmly in the heart of the goddess, in my heart, just as the goddess remains in yours, as I remain in yours. We are a divine waterfall for each other where we can bathe ourselves in light and quench our absolute thirst.

The universe is a great pot that we never stop shaping with our flesh, our hearts, our thought–with all those little things that we love to separate from one another by artifice. But a good potter sinks their hands into the divine and lets the divine take varied forms. They know that the earth contains the thirty-six modalities of consciousness, and they don’t spend time analyzing them.

While man thinks, the tantrika [practioner] makes a pot. While man confines his consciousness, the tantrika widens the opening of the pot and lets their consciousness experience the void. Distinguishing between what’s insides the pot and what’s outside is possible only if you forget that a pot needs an opening, without which there is seclusion, darkness, rot, and decay.

The tantrika widens their pot. They enjoy letting the universe spill in and penetrate it. When they meditate, they experience a single space. When they undergo change, they experience a single space. When they dream, they experience a single space, and when they die, they experience nothing other than a single space. So for them, there is no difference between meditation, living, dreaming, and dying. To experience a single space–that’s absolute love.”

What I love about Tantric philosophy is that everything is an opportunity to get you closer/discover/remember divinity. Why shy away from adversity or uncomfortable situations that make their way onto our paths? It’s all an opportunity to go deeper into ourselves and let go of more stories/shit that we think we need to hold on to. Widen your pot, watch with wonder as the universe spills into.

Wishing you an awe-inspiring autumn!

 

PS.

Practice yoga online with me or catch me at my next yoga event

 

 

 

 

Peace Mantra

Peace mantra

Peace Mantra

AUM saha navavatu, saha nau bhunaktu
Saha veeryam karvaavahai
Tejasvi naa vadhita mastu
maa vid vishaa va hai
AUM shaantih, shaantih, shaantih.

Meaning of the Sahanavavatu Mantra

Let us together (-saha) be protected (-na vavatu) and let us together be nourished (-bhunaktu) by God’s blessings. Let us together join our mental forces in strength (-veeryam) for the benefit of humanity (-karvaa vahai). Let our efforts at learning be luminous (-tejasvi) and filled with joy, and endowed with the force of purpose (-vadhita mastu). Let us never (-maa) be poisoned (-vishaa) with the seeds of hatred for anyone. Let there be peace and serenity (-shaantih) in all the three universes.

This mantra highlights the nature of the teacher-student relationship that produces ideal results for the student. The transference of mental, spiritual and intellectual energies from the teacher to the student can be achieved through a mutually nourishing relationship which is based on (mutual) respect, joy (of giving and receiving), and absence of malice or negative thoughts.

The “Sahanavavatu mantra” is one of the shaanti (peace) mantras which has its origins in the Taittiriya Upanisad. This mantra is often used as a “universal” prayer, to send the message of peace and prosperity. The mantra may also be used to invoke God’s blessings for harmony amongst teacher(s) and student(s).

Source: http://www.eaglespace.com/spirit/sahanavavatu_mantra.php

 

PS.

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Blues yoga playlist

davis gr

Yoga teachers or yoga studios always have an amazing playlist that you can easily do all your yoga moves to. However, when you are doing yoga at home, you end up wondering which music you should play in the background. Some people are okay with doing yoga in silence while others need a beat of the music to which they can sync their yoga movements. A Blues playlist is what you need when you are feeling a little stressed and you need to let it all out. The musical beats will resonate with your feelings and yoga moves.

Background Music for Yoga at Home

When you are doing yoga at home, you do not have to go with the same playlist every day. Sometimes, you are doing yoga as a part of your daily routine while at other times, you are doing it to relieve some stress. The playlist differs based on what purpose you are doing yoga for. An upbeat playlist is for times when you are in the mood and you just want to bust some nice moves to stretch your body and feel active. On the other hand, if you are slightly stressed and you want to relieve the tension, you should go for a more laid-back playlist.

A Blues Playlist for Yoga

The music genre, Blues, originated back in the 1870s. Having its roots in African-American traditions and musical culture, this genre has become popular in the whole world now. This genre does not only have instrumentation but there are also bass lines and lyrics. So, you get the best of everything with such a playlist. Back in the day, the first time of the song was repeated four times. Even though the pattern has changed since then, there is still a lot of repetition. This is really great for yoga since you need to do repeated movements and your body will be able to create a rhythm with the same music being played four to eight times.

This playlist has some amazing songs such as ‘Go with Love’ in which Taylor McFerrin is addressing a lover who does not believe in their love anymore. Then, there is Kojak asking a lover to tell what is on their mind even though it will break the singer’s heart. As you go down the playlist, Aretha Franklin sings for you to get on a train that you do not need a ticket for. It is a song for the Lord’s praise, a song about hope and faith. You will find something to love in every single song.

1. Wayfaring Stranger-Jamie Woon

2. Go With Love-Rah Feat. Taylor McFerrin

3. No Shoes-John Lee Hooker

4. Take My Hand-Ben Harper

5. The Thrill is Gone-BB King

6. Do You Feel Me?-Anthony Hamilton

7. The Truth-Kojak

8. Otherside of the Game-Erykah Badu

9. Satisfied Mind-Ben Harper

10. Where Could I Go?-Ben Harper

11. Just the Two of Us-Bill Withers

12. Nothing Even Matters-Lauryn Hill Feat D’Angelo

13. People Get Ready-Aretha Franklin

14. The Grey Funnel Line-Maddy Prior & June Tabor

 

PS.